The End - 2000 to 2009

Maliki Fiqh Resources

  • Author: MR
  • Filed under: General, Islam
  • Date: Aug 20,2007 | 08:40 AM

Shaykh Abdullah bin Bayyah, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf, Dr. Abdal Hakim Jackson, Imam Suhaib Webb, Shaykh Muhammad al Yaqoubi (former-Hanafi) are some of the famous Maliki’s I know of. I have been recently thinking about switching to Maliki fiqh. Why? Well, as you all know, Imam Malik lived and died in Madinah. His Muwatta was the first collection of sound and authentic ahadith before Imam Bukhari and Imam Muslim. It is commonly known that the Maliki madhab is the way of the people of Madinah. As we all know Madinah is the city of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him). He was born in 93 AH and died in 179 AH making him a member of salaf us salih (the pious predecessors). His ancestry traces back to Yemen, and we all know how blessed the lands of Yemen are from what the Prophet has said. Doesn’t that make you want to be Maliki? 😀

The only problem I had was the lack of easy accessible Maliki fiqh resources, until in recent years a lot of translations popped up and a revival of the madhab in the West occurred. Anyways Sidi Alex compiled a list of Maliki fiqh resources for me and shared it with everyone else. Check it out here. Edit: So the post does not exist anymore. Here is what it had:

1. http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/ABewley/Page17.html

2: (partial) http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/ABewley/Malik.html and
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/ABewley/usul.html

3: (Not to be confused with he forthcoming “Original Islam & the Madhhab of Medina” about which there has been some controversy) http://www.amazon.com/Origins-Islamic-Law-Muwatta-Civilization/dp/0700716696/ref=sr_1_3/103-9700934-0225411?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1187389947&sr=1-3
4: I have Dr. Umar’s thesis (800+ pages). If you’re going to ISNA, I’ll bring for you on a thumb drive. Bring your laptop.

5: http://islamicbookstore.com/b9260.html

6: http://www.astrolabe.com/product/2732/Imam…slamic_Law.html

7: http://kitaabun.com/shopping3/product_info…fd2eceafce80e1b

8: http://www.seekingilm.com/books/murshid.pdf (bear in mind this is a literal translation, mainly useful as a crutch for the Arab-speaking student. There are also no explanatory notes, such that it remains less than useful as a learning resource.)

9: http://kitaabun.com/shopping3/product_info…?products_id=28

10: Sheikh Abdullah’s lectures are in Arabic (obviously) but I have his series on usul al-fiqh translated by Sheikh Hamza. I can lend it to you if:
A- You return it! and
B- You do NOT make a copy.

11: http://lamppostproductions.org/

You might also consider:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MalikiFiqhGroup/ there a number of very knowledgeable persons there, as well as a good collection of files, including translations of the Mukhtasar al-Akhadari and Qadhi ‘Iyad’s ‘Foundations of Islam” as well as several good resources in Arabic.

http://www.yantaru.org/library.php
http://www.liccsd.org/books.html
http://www.sankore.org/public_html/index2.html

You should also take a look at (and take!) the course on Maliki Fiqh offered by Sunnipath http://www.sunnipath.com/Academy/Online/Co…lam-maliki.aspx which as a semester long explanation of al-’Asmawiyyah (you’ll also get a copy of Sheikh Ramzy’s unpublished translation of the matn)

History, Development, and Modern Application http://www.sunnipath.com/Academy/Online/Co…slamic-law.aspx

And also their Foundations of Islamic Law

This is probably just me talking, I’ll probably be Hanafi all my life. After all, Imam Abu Hanifah did meet some Sahabas (ra) so that beats the other 3 great mujtahid Imams.


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  • 37 Responses for "Maliki Fiqh Resources"

    1. ... August 20th, 2007 at 9:24 am

      imam Abu Hanifa’ fiqh had most barakah , just travel around the world and you’ll know wht im talking about =)
      ”under the scroll of shade” by Mohammad Al-Shareef

    2. Mujahideen Ryder August 20th, 2007 at 9:32 am

      on August 20, 2007 at 9:24 am said:

      imam Abu Hanifa’ fiqh had most barakah , just travel around the world and you’ll know wht im talking about =)
      ”under the scroll of shade” by Mohammad Al-Shareef

      Yeah of course. It’s the largest most widespread madhab in the entire world.

    3. Munzareen August 20th, 2007 at 10:21 am

      Eh.

      4 paths to the same goal insha’Allah. :)

      but of course there’s the whole shafii madhab is better than hanafi post, one of our fellow bloggers put up. now there’s your i wanna be maliki post. maybe we should have a hanafi post something too :).

      alhamdulillah. you’re right though, the maliki madhab is being revived in the west..i’m seeing more resources and more people i know are becoming maliki. whatever gives you the most ease i suppose.

    4. Mujahideen Ryder August 20th, 2007 at 10:26 am

      but of course there’s the whole shafii madhab is better than hanafi post, one of our fellow bloggers put up. now there’s your i wanna be maliki post. maybe we should have a hanafi post something too :).

      Where is this Shafi better than Hanafi post!? haha

    5. Yaser August 20th, 2007 at 10:26 am

      Imam Malik’s merits are uncountable. Except one correction, I don’t know if by chornology Imam Malik’s book was first collection, but Imam Abi Hanifah did compile Kitab Al Athar, a book of ahadith Sh. Tahir al Qadri has shown to be one of the best books ahadith out there, and according to some scholars was the basis of Imam Malik’s Muwatta, which was the basis of Imam Bukahari’s Sahih.

      But I love the Malikis. As I’ve said before, if I weren’t a Hanafi [and I love them] I love the Malikis. :)

    6. Iboo August 20th, 2007 at 11:52 am

      Hey Muj, Where did you hear that Mo al Yaqoobi was no longer following Hanafi Fiqh?

    7. Abu Dani August 20th, 2007 at 11:56 am

      Salam,

      Just to share some little knowledge of mine.

      Imam Abu Hanifah was born in the year 80 Hijra, Imam Malik was born 13 years after that and was one of Imam Syafie’s teacher who is of the Bani Hashim clan and related to our prophet thru his grandfather Abdul Mutalib.Imam Syafie was one of Imam Ibn Hambal’s teacher.

      Islam is Islam. No need to fight over which Mazhab is better. Even Imam Syafie once said “Whichever Hadith is an authentic Hadith it is also my Hadith”

      The Imams themselves mentioned that “whoever of you who are at lost, go back to the Quran and Hadith”.

      Thus it is not conditioned on us to stick to only 1 mazhab. It is more of a factor of time and space.

      There are lots of examples of well known scholars from different mazhabs practicing from other mazhabs in their on mazhabs.

      So just remember Islam is 1. The mazhabs are here to help guide us thru time and location.

      Wallahualam.

    8. Yaser August 20th, 2007 at 11:56 am

      He heard it from me [Yaser].

    9. Adam August 20th, 2007 at 1:37 pm

      come over to our side Amir!!! Mwa ha ha ha ha

    10. Abul-Hussein August 20th, 2007 at 2:21 pm

      AS

      Thank you for the sincere effort at making studying maliki fiqh more easy. With being irksome if I may make a small correction to the statement above regarding the Kitab al-Athar by Akhi Yasser. This work is not that of Imam Abu Hanifa [r] but rather Muhammad Hasan ash-Shaybani[r]there is no work written by the hand of Imam Abu Hanifa {r} refer to al-Insaf by Shah Wali Ullah {r}.

      In addition, the Muwatta was collected only from Ahadith related in the Hijaz so it is impossible that the Kitab al-Athar or the Musnad attributed to Imam Abu Hanifa is the basis of the Muwatta as these books relate from the ahadith related in Iraq.

      In fact, Muhammad Hasan ash-Shaybani {r}studied hadith with Imam Malik [r].

      Abul-Hussein
      Student of Malik Fiqh
      Cairo Egypt

    11. yaser August 20th, 2007 at 2:38 pm

      Walikum Assalam

      Jazakallah Abul Hussein

      Just small clarification on what I meant – We still refer to Imam Abu Hanifah as the author, just as we refer to Fiqh Akbar and his other works, even though they are transmitted via others later on. But Jazakallah for the correction.

      As for basis, I did not mean the same ahadith or the same core of material but rather the idea of actually collecting ahadith into an actual piece of writing. I could easily be wrong as I am only a very bad talab al ‘ilm and only on the beginning of the path. I refer to the idea that it was one of the first books composed [on the matter of collecting ahadith as well] which was not that common with the Tabi’in (or Sahabah [although I believe ‘Abdullab b. ‘Amr b. Al ‘As had a collection of ahadith written as well, could be easily wrong]). With that in mind (the recording of ahadith in one place), then I’d consider Imam Malik’s Muwatta a book in the footsteps of Imam Abu Hanifah’s Kitab Al Athar. Jazakallah khayran sidi, wallahu A’lam.

    12. yaser August 20th, 2007 at 2:40 pm

      I also apologize for my bad writing.

    13. Khadija August 20th, 2007 at 2:54 pm

      ahhh
      I was actually born into a Maliki family but being in the usa there are so many hanfis and no resources to study my deen so i was JUST about to switch to hanafi and alhamdulilah sunnipath started offering the maliki fiqh course and i discovered so many more maliki fiqh resources!!
      :))

    14. jinnzaman August 20th, 2007 at 4:15 pm

      Assalamu alaikum

      As someone who switched madhaib (from hanafi to maliki then back to hanafi), I’d recommend switching a school only if one can acquire knowledge of that madhab from a constant and reliable source.

      also, switching madhaib can cause some confusion in your rulings. whats more important than what madhab you follow is consistency in your actions.

      also, before you switch, study the hanafi madhab’s usul a little bit or read the shafi’i critique of the amal of madinah in order to get a more wholistic perspective.

      but alhumdulillah, the revival of any madhab in the West is welcome. we could use as much revival of the classical traditions as possible.

      :)

      masalama

    15. aysha August 20th, 2007 at 5:10 pm

      hmm… Sh. Hamza Yusuf is a Maliki Fiqh resource? does that mean he is Maliki? because i always thought he was Hanafi.

    16. aysha August 20th, 2007 at 5:11 pm

      a disadvantage to becoming Maliki would be that the Sunnipath Q&A is only answered by the Hanafi and Shaf’i Fiqh Team 😛

    17. aarij August 20th, 2007 at 6:40 pm

      “This is probably just me talking, I’ll probably be Hanafi all my life. After all, Imam Abu Hanifah did meet some Sahabas (ra) so that beats the other 3 great mujtahid Imams.”

      Which Sahabas did he meet? And did he study under them (because I think he started his Islamic education later on in his life, wAllahu alim)?

      For me, fiqh for me is: taharah, salah and siyam (don’t make enough to give zakat!!). For everything else, the hadith (paraphrased) “If in doubt, then leave” suffices.

      For taharah, I take the safest opinion (usually that of Imam Ahmad) in a matter of ikhtilaaf…unless a compelling argument is brought forth.
      For salah, I take my salah from Sh. Nasiruddin AlAlbani’s book “Prayer of the Prophet” (it’s pretty much identical to the madhab of Imam Ahmad). Issues of salah not in that book are either Hanbali positions or the opinions of some of the great contemporary ‘ulema.
      For siyam, I guess it’ll be the madhab of Imam Ahmad too because that’s what Sh. Yasir Qadhi taught us that in his Basic Fiqh series.

    18. ExEx Blogger August 20th, 2007 at 8:41 pm

      Imam Abu Hanifa – May Allah have mercy on him. What a great scholar. The Hanfiyyah school of thought is by far the weakest in proofs compared to the other schools of thought. The reason is that most of the ahadeeth were not compiled then. In fact Abu Hanifah was very weak in Ahadeeth, with all due respect and honor to Imam Abu Hanifah. Some narrations mention that he only narrated a little bit over 40. Yet, the spread of the Hanafiyyah school of thought does not make it better than anything else. The thing that brings barakah is the following of the sunnah. For verily had Abu Hanifah or the other scholars not exist but rather others, we would still have to follow the sunnah. The glory of the madhab lies in the fact that each of the 4 scholars declared their innocence from their opinions should theirs contradict the sunnah. Sadly, many people claim today that they follow Abu Hanifah and still don’t know what the Aqeedah of Abu Hanifah regarding where is Allah. Abu Hanifah is clear on where Allah is. But many Deobandis, Matureedis and Sufis believe that God everywhere. Just take this on for size. Abu Hanifah once said, “Whoever says I don’t know where my Lord is, in the heavens or in the earth then he is a disbeliever, and the same goes for his throne because He rose above the throne.”

    19. abdul-karim al-hanbali August 20th, 2007 at 9:07 pm

      I prefer the Hanbali madhhab. Since Imam Ahmad (rahimahullah) was able to have knowledge of the previous three Imams, I find his madhhab to be the most balanced out of all four.

    20. Mujahideen Ryder August 20th, 2007 at 9:20 pm

      ExEx Blogger on August 20, 2007 at 8:41 pm said:

      Imam Abu Hanifa – May Allah have mercy on him. What a great scholar. The Hanfiyyah school of thought is by far the weakest in proofs compared to the other schools of thought. The reason is that most of the ahadeeth were not compiled then. In fact Abu Hanifah was very weak in Ahadeeth, with all due respect and honor to Imam Abu Hanifah. Some narrations mention that he only narrated a little bit over 40. Yet, the spread of the Hanafiyyah school of thought does not make it better than anything else. The thing that brings barakah is the following of the sunnah. For verily had Abu Hanifah or the other scholars not exist but rather others, we would still have to follow the sunnah. The glory of the madhab lies in the fact that each of the 4 scholars declared their innocence from their opinions should theirs contradict the sunnah. Sadly, many people claim today that they follow Abu Hanifah and still don’t know what the Aqeedah of Abu Hanifah regarding where is Allah. Abu Hanifah is clear on where Allah is. But many Deobandis, Matureedis and Sufis believe that God everywhere. Just take this on for size. Abu Hanifah once said, “Whoever says I don’t know where my Lord is, in the heavens or in the earth then he is a disbeliever, and the same goes for his throne because He rose above the throne.”

      JazakAllah khair for the comment Shaykh Chao, but I think their is a misconception within the Maturidi aqeedah regarding this. I actually have a translation by Shaykh Abdur-Rahman ibn Yusuf of Imam Abu Hanifa’s Fiqh al-Akbar in which on the bottom of page 102, it says:

      Abu Hanifa says in his book Al-Wasiyya, “We agree that Allah is established (istawa) on the Throne without His needing it or resting (istiqrar) on it, and He is the Guardian of the Throne and all besides the Throne. If He were in need, He would not have been able to bring into existence the universe or administrate over its affairs, just as created beings cannot. If He was in need of sitting [on it], then before the creation of the Throne, where was He Most High? In effect, He is transcendent of all this.”

      Right after that part it says on the next page, page 103:

      When asked about the establishment (istiwa’) on the Throne, Imam Malik responded by saying, “The establishment is known, the ‘how’ (kayf) is unknown; asking about it is an innovation, and belief in it is obligatory.” This is the way of the pious predecessors (salaf) and it is the safest path, and Allah knows best

      That pretty much sums it up in a nice way. Basically Allah is Allah, He is All Knowing and All Seeing. Khalas! 😀

    21. Mujahideen Ryder August 20th, 2007 at 9:22 pm

      In other words, Allah is everywhere with his knowledge and sight.

    22. ExEx Blogger August 20th, 2007 at 9:50 pm

      No that’s is not true. Allah is not everywhere. Allah is physically above his throne as he says in the Quran. His knowledge is everywhere.

    23. ExEx Blogger August 20th, 2007 at 9:52 pm

      Yes, the howness and “kayf” is unknown. Just because it’s unknown doesn’t mean we don’t know the direction. The hadeeth of the Jaariyah explains it in which the Prophet peace upon him ask a slave girl where is Allah and she pointed up. She didn’t point in all directions. Why would the Quran say, that it was SENT DOWN. If Allah is everywhere, then how is everywhere bring it DOWN?

    24. ExEx Blogger August 20th, 2007 at 9:54 pm

      The statement, “That is not true” is refering to the Maturidi aqeedah. They do believe that Allah is physically everywhere. Just because the official students of Abu Hanifa had proper aqeedah, many hanafi/pakistani deobandi scholars have maturidi/murjiee belief which includes that Allah is everywhere.

    25. Mujahideen Ryder August 20th, 2007 at 10:09 pm

      ExEx Blogger on August 20, 2007 at 9:50 pm said:

      No that’s is not true. Allah is not everywhere. Allah is physically above his throne as he says in the Quran. His knowledge is everywhere.

      Thats what i said. Allah’s knowledge and sight is everywhere. We are agreeing?

      ExEx Blogger on August 20, 2007 at 9:52 pm said:

      Yes, the howness and “kayf” is unknown. Just because it’s unknown doesn’t mean we don’t know the direction. The hadeeth of the Jaariyah explains it in which the Prophet peace upon him ask a slave girl where is Allah and she pointed up. She didn’t point in all directions. Why would the Quran say, that it was SENT DOWN. If Allah is everywhere, then how is everywhere bring it DOWN?

      We are also agreeing here. haha. Shaykh Chao, I think you reading these statements too much.

      ExEx Blogger on August 20, 2007 at 9:54 pm said:

      The statement, “That is not true” is refering to the Maturidi aqeedah. They do believe that Allah is physically everywhere. Just because the official students of Abu Hanifa had proper aqeedah, many hanafi/pakistani deobandi scholars have maturidi/murjiee belief which includes that Allah is everywhere.

      I just quoted the text which Maturidi’s use which doesn’t say that. I guess Shaykh Abdur Rahman ibn Yusuf is a Deobandi-Matruidi-Hanafi who isn’t the Maturidi you are talking about.

    26. Mujahideen Ryder August 20th, 2007 at 10:20 pm

      Shaykh Chao, even SunniPath agrees with you:

      Is it permissible to believe that Allah is everywhere?

      The belief that Allah Most High is personally in every location is a completely false belief that is not permissible for anyone to hold. Rather, what is obligatory to believe (as mentioned above) is that Allah is transcendently beyond occupying space and it is obligatory to forbid anyone who says anything else, for [h: anything else] constitutes anthropomorphism [4], which is completely incorrect. An example [h: of such anthropomorphism] is what some ignorant laypeople over here say (intending to venerate Allah by their saying it), “Glory be to Him in His place.” It is obligatory to explain the mistakenness of this expression and to guide them to what is correct.

      If, however, a Muslim believes that Allah is everywhere in His knowledge, thereby meaning that He (Glory be to Him) knows everything at every time and place, it is a correct belief and it what is meant by His Most High’s saying, “He is with you wherever you are,” (57:4) i.e., “He is with you in His knowledge so that nothing of His creation is concealed from him.”

      Source

      Let’s agree that we shouldn’t be discussing this, just believe in it.

    27. Abul Layth August 21st, 2007 at 12:30 am

      EXEXBLOGGER said,

      “No that’s is not true. Allah is not everywhere. Allah is physically above his throne as he says in the Quran. His knowledge is everywhere.”

      Allah does not say He is “physically over the throne”. You have lied. Funny how you declare Allah to have “physicality”.

      And you contradict yourself. You say “The kaf is unknown” then you tell us HOW HE IS by “being over the throne physically”. You should follow the madh-hab of the Salaf and leave these aayaat and aathaar alone without your sick and twisted meanings that have no legitimacy in the creed of the salaf.

      Do as Imam Ahmad said, “We affirm them…without modality and howness.”

      You have done everything but that!

    28. abdul-karim al-hanbali August 21st, 2007 at 12:53 am

      EXEXBLOGGER, your intentions are good, but you have a poor understanding of Salafi aqeedah. Go to IslamicAwakening.com and read akhi Abuz-Zubair’s stuff about aqeedah.

    29. ExEx Blogger August 21st, 2007 at 7:48 am

      @ Abul Layth
      So are you saying that the word “istawa” has no meaning? When Allah says that he rose above the throne, are you saying that we don’t know what this is? Is this a Quran just words with unknown meaning? Just because we affirm his direction as in the hadeeth doesn’t mean that we have done the “howness”. The reason is that Allah affirmed it himself! And when I say physicality, I meant HIMSELF. Abu Layth, you are a grave worshipper, so you can take your rudeness back to your graves and seek their guidance!

      @ Abdul Karim

      I am not confused about Aqeedah. I have a degree in Aqeedah. For people to say that we “affirm” without howness but not attribute the meaning to it is to say that we don’t understand what the word Istawaa means. And Imam Malik said, its KNOWN. If the meaning was unknown, how can he say it. So the scholars say that yes, Allah himself is above the throne. BUT, the howness of how he’s above is unknown.

    30. Nuqtah August 21st, 2007 at 9:02 am

      Oh boy,

      Anyway I’ve always had affinity towards madhhab of Imam Ahmad but due to lack of resources in english I’ve decided to put a halt on my ambitions of becoming a ‘Hanbali’. Right now I’m following the Shafi’i madhhab due to availability of excellent fiqh resources like al-maqasid, Reliance, Sunni Path Shafi’i fiqh section etc…

      May Allah keep us all firm on truth, ameen.

    31. KK August 21st, 2007 at 12:15 pm

      Shaykh Muhammad al-Yaqoubi is now following the Maliki madhab? Are you sure?

    32. KK August 21st, 2007 at 12:28 pm

      Just noticed that according to wikipedia he is a Hanafi.

    33. yaser August 21st, 2007 at 12:44 pm

      I head it from him his own lips sitting at his feet. I miss Damascus. Wallahu A’lam.

      As for the above comments – Silence is salvation.

      Keep me in your du’aa

    34. Munzareen August 21st, 2007 at 1:20 pm

      Allah is where He has always been.

      :) Right MR?

      How’d we get onto the whole Where is Allah discussion from a post on Maliki Fiqh resources?

      Ya Rabb. May Allah help us and guide us and keep us away from speech that is not beneficial and allow us to control our tongues.

    35. abdul-karim al-hanbali August 21st, 2007 at 4:18 pm

      “I am not confused about Aqeedah. I have a degree in Aqeedah. For people to say that we “affirm” without howness but not attribute the meaning to it is to say that we don’t understand what the word Istawaa means. And Imam Malik said, its KNOWN. If the meaning was unknown, how can he say it. So the scholars say that yes, Allah himself is above the throne. BUT, the howness of how he’s above is unknown.”

      I agree, but I was talking about your uneccesary usage of terms like “physical”. Your basically throwing out bait for the Asharis to bite.

    36. Jawad August 21st, 2007 at 4:42 pm

      Amir, you should really consider deleting comments by people that are inflammatory and those that incite others to use harsh words. If it’s possible, close the commenting on this post. The post has been hijacked and the topic has been diverted from Maliki fiqh resources to discussions on Aqeedah. People are attacking each other, and if they themselves have no self-control, then you should step in to prevent people from sinning any further.

      Muslims here are discussing with each other a topic that we, as laymen, don’t have the authority to argue about. Aqeedah is such a fragile science of Islam, one wrong belief, and a Muslim can become an unbeliever. Matters of Aqeedah should only be acquired from an authorized scholar. And if one does receive authorization to teach, then open your mouth to spread the knowledge. If you haven’t, then the best solution is silence.

      And when “discussing” this topic, they have abandoned what Rasulullah (salla allahu alayhi wa aalihi wa sallam) said constituted half our faith: adab. Honestly, it is very despicable to see that there are Muslims here trying to spread knowledge that the have learned (which is so commendable) yet they forget about the most important component of spreading that knowledge, and that again is adab. ‘Abd Allah ibn al-Mubarak said: “I studied adab for thirty years and I studied knowledge for twenty years.” And I think we can learn a lot from this great scholar and piece of advice. Wallahu ‘alam.

      Please forgive me for anything wrong I may have said, and forgive me if I have offended anyone, for that was not my intention.

      So Amir, step in and prevent this from escalating any further.

      As Munzareen said: “Ya Rabb. May Allah help us and guide us and keep us away from speech that is not beneficial and allow us to control our tongues.” Ameen Ya Rabb Ameen!

    37. Mujahideen Ryder August 21st, 2007 at 4:49 pm

      Good point Jawad. JazakAllah khair.

      I swear, I need to hire an editor and a moderator.

      Comments closed. Sorry!

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