The End - 2000 to 2009

Russian-Chechnyian War Ends?

  • Author: MR
  • Filed under: Asia, News, Russia
  • Date: Apr 16,2009 | 11:04 PM

MOSCOW — Russia officially ended what it called its counterterrorism operation in the southern region of Chechnya on Thursday with an announcement that carried symbolic weight as the end of a decade of Muslim separatist battles for independence.

If this is in fact actually true, then alhamdulillah. May Allah continue to help and protect the people of Chechnya.

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  • 33 Responses for "Russian-Chechnyian War Ends?"

    1. Mustafa April 17th, 2009 at 8:25 am

      Moscow admits the cancellation of war is a propaganda sham:

      http://www.kavkazcenter.com/eng/content/2009/04/17/10659.shtml

    2. Yusuf Smith April 17th, 2009 at 8:54 am

      As-Salaamu ‘alaikum,

      “End of the war” means Ramzan Kadyrov, a gangster and a tyrant, is in full control of the place. His brutality is well-documented by Muslim, western and Russian sources.

    3. AnonyMuslim April 18th, 2009 at 12:51 pm

      It’s unfortunate that after the death of the noble leader Aslan Mashkadov (Rahim Allah Alayhi) the Chechen resistance took a sharp turn to radicalism and alienated their cause completely from those who were inclined to support them. A cursorylook at “Kavkaz Center” will show you that the new breed of “Chechen” Rebels share more in common with Osama Bin Laden and AQ’s international goals than the original Chechen resistance leader Dzhokhar Dudayev (RA). What a shame.

    4. Phil April 28th, 2009 at 3:07 am

      Just me thinking but what was the better approach, the one the Chechens took or the one that Tatarstan(also known as Kazan) took?

      And yes its a farse that the “war is over”. The Rus will keep keeping the population down because they know that Chechens are a lot better fighters than any Slavic Russian.

    5. DCSeeker August 1st, 2009 at 8:19 pm

      لسلام عليكم
      Many people do not understand that Russia has propped up an apostate dictator in Chechnya. Ramzan Kadryov and his henchmen were recently accused/suspected of murdering a prminent human rights worker who criticized the new governments torture of citizens, execution of citizens believed to be “too Muslim” (individuals who are more Sunni than Sufi) and execution of family members of the mujahideen. A good youtube video explains the situation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0fSkdx2xbA
      Tragedy continues to unfold in Chechnya but so many in the ummah just don’t know about how Muslims suffer in Chechnya! Spread the word! Insha’Allah, the suffering of Chechnya at the hands of this apostate will end.

    6. TheSoundMind August 1st, 2009 at 9:19 pm

      Murder is not an act of Riddah. No matter how many people a ruler has killed, that doesn’t make that ruler a kafir. Even if he killed ulema. Unless you hear or see kufr things from someone suspected of being muslim. You don’t call them a kafir.

      Though, I do not know about the leader of chechniya. It may be a case he is an apostate from another situation, I don’t know. But for murdering, he is not.

    7. DCSeeker August 1st, 2009 at 10:27 pm

      لسلام عليكم
      What must be understood first is that Ramzan Kadryov was “put in place” by a kafir government (Russia). We (the ummah) now have such a large body of evidence documenting the misdeeds of Ramzan Kadryov we can comfortably call him an apostate. Beyond the minor things (fighting dogs, drinking with prostitutes in the UAE, etc) his crimes against Muslims in Chechnya is beyond reproof. It is not just NCO evidence either (Amnesty International, Doctors Without Borders, etc) but a variety of Muslim charities that have documented his crimes. Imam Anwar al Alwaki has been particularly astute about providing Quranic and Hadith proofs that clearly place Ramzan Kadryov in the “kafir bracket.” Beyond this, we can simply employ common sense! Certainly the mujahideen in Chechnya have been radicalized; but we are also talking about an environment (Chechnya) where Salafi and Sunni views are blanketed with the (misunderstood) term “Wahhabi.” Insha’Allah the truth will come to light. Ramzan Kadryov murders and tortures Muslims. Ramzan Kadryov receives economic and material support from a kafir government (Russia) who has completely (literally) destroyed Chechnya twice within the last 20 years; and a government that has attempted to first stifle and then smother Muslim traditions and beliefs that might lead Chechnyans to question being ruled by a militaristic government rooted in both Communism and totalitarianism. Allah knows best.
      http://www.anwar-alawlaki.com/?p=88

    8. TheSoundMind August 2nd, 2009 at 12:34 am

      Nothing you mentioned constitues Kufr. Fighting Muslims, and even killing them is not kufr. Muawiya fought against many muslims and against Ali and many were killed. Muawiya is still a muslim and a companion.

      All you have really stated is that this guy is, by your word, a major sinner. Sinning isn’t Kufr. Being “put in place” by kufar isn’t kufr. There is no country today that has its leadership placed by Muslims. The leaders may be muslim, but the ones who enabled them to take power [after WW2 for instance] were not.

    9. DCSeeker August 2nd, 2009 at 12:59 am

      لسلام عليكم

      The general “requirements” for apostasy are:

      *Contradicting the positions that are upheld by a consensus (ijma) of Muslim scholars
      *A public declaration or conduct that denies Islam, its beliefs, symbols or its principal actors.

      To be sure Ramzan Kadryov also displays examples of specific Kafir belief:

      ” Kufrul-Nifaaq:” Disbelief out of hypocrisy.This applies to someone who pretends to be a believer but conceals his disbelief.

      *”Kufrul-Istibdaal:” Disbelief because of trying to substitute Allah’s Laws.”

      *”Substituting Allah’s laws with man-made laws.”

    10. Atif C. December 11th, 2009 at 7:06 pm

      With all due respect, this whole argument about whether Kadyrov or any of his other disgraceful gangster cronies are officially “kuffar” or “apostates” seems really grounded in technicality, irrelevant and maybe even a little petty…the bottom line is that there is abundant evidence to show that these are a REPUGNANT group of guys who, regardless of their political position over the Chechnya question, have committed great crimes against their own people. Is that not reason enough for them to earn our collective scorn?

    11. DCSeeker December 11th, 2009 at 8:25 pm

      لسلام عليكم

      It is true that people, regardless of faith, should be repulsed by Kadyrov. His status as a Muslim however, is important. It was a given that the West would completely turn their back on Chechnya, but Kadryov does receive support from nations with Muslim governments (like the UAE). If Kadryov can be labeled an apostate (I believe the evidence suggests he is) it gives license for Muslims in Chechnya and elsewhere to remove him. It means that fatwas calling for jihad and his removal are valid and within the framework of Islam.

    12. Atif C. December 13th, 2009 at 6:33 am

      Walaikum as Salaam brother…ah okay I see your point now…and indeed it’s actually a very interesting framework!

      I just foresee one potential problem… I suspect those some of the people invoking those hypothetical fatwahs may end up being just as bad if not worse than the recipients. As several people have previously pointed out, certain segments of the current Chechen resistance has been so radicalized to the point where the shame and infamy of their blatant acts of terrorism seem to entirely betray the example set by so many of their brave and noble predecessors (such as Dudayev and Maskhadov, Allah (SWT) have mercy on their souls).

      Will such terrorists (should they effectively hijack the Chechen resistance) really do much of a better job than collaborationist gangsters and thugs when it comes to effectively leading and governing the long-suffering people of Chechnya? Allah (SWT) protect the weak and the innocent.

    13. DCSeeker December 13th, 2009 at 11:48 am

      لسلام عليكم
      Atif, you make a perfectly valid (and excellent point). To be sure even the most “Islamic” amongst us looked at the takeover of a Russian school (Beslan) as an extreme move by the Chechen resistance. Even if what Shamil Basayev later claimed was true – that the Russians had initiated the shooting and they were mostly responsible for the casualties, one has to question if the mujaheddin acted within the framework off what is permissible within Islam. The “they kill our children so we kill theirs” may seem to make an inverted sort of sense in a dirty war, but to be sure I don’t think anything in the Noble Qur’an, the Sunnah or the Hadith even comes close to rationalizing or permitting such actions. Osama Bin Laden has used similar faulty logic to justify acts of martyrdom and terrorism against the West but most scholars seem to agree that even if the West has a “terroristic” foreign policy against the Muslim world, it is not justified to use terrorism as a response. It is simply not allowed under any Islamic jurisprudence and it brings the mujahidin down to the level of our oppressors. To tie this into Chechnya….I believe Ramzan Kadryov is an apostate. I am not a scholar, a geopolitical expert and I don’t even speak the Chechen language. I do however believe that the burden is upon all Muslims to point out injustice and terror no matter who the perpetrator is. A minority of scholars has issued fatwas against Kadryov and I think that they have a legitimate framework for doing so. Even the more moderate scholars in the West (Sheyk Hamza Yusuf) have declared that jihad most certainly has a military component – but that certain conditions must be met (Sheyk Yusuf has never commented on Chechnya). The radicalization of the Chechen resistance can be looked at more simply as a movement rooted in nationalism (1st Chechen war) that logically migrated to religion (2nd Chechen war). And, to be honest, I think the persecution of “Wahhabism” in Chechnya is an attempt to snuff out real Islam. Of course Kadryov and his Russian friends would love to see the watered down brand of Sufism remain the norm in Chechnya because even a basic interpretation of Islam would expose Kadryov. In short, you have radical elements within the Chechen resistance (Beslan) but overall I think the jihad in Chechnya is justified and I would hope that it eventually openly supported by countries with Muslim governments and Muslim individuals worldwide.

    14. al-suyuufi December 13th, 2009 at 1:16 pm

      But even after Beslan, Basayev expressed regret for the unintended casualties – the sloppy Russian attempts to raid the school caused a lot of deaths, such as their firing which made portions of the roof collapse on hostages. Either way, Basayev made it clear that these operations were done out of sheer necessity. However when one of the Islamist Chechens became president of Chechnya (his name was Sadulayev) he appointed Basayev to as deputy prime minister (this was after Beslan) but also strictly forbade certain things such as hostage-takings, indicating that there is also self-correction, not just ruthlessness

    15. DCSeeker December 13th, 2009 at 1:33 pm

      You have to question why Basayev would occupy a school in the first place (?). I think it is a given that the Russian media and the Western media put their own propaganda spin on the event, but the mujaheddin produced video to document the siege. and the video clearly, explicitly shows children urinating and defecating on themselves, sitting in their own vomit, crying, feverish, women passing out from dehydration, toddlers forced to sit on wires linked to explosives….regardless of what the Russians did to force the situation, you have to ask yourself if what the mujaheddin was acceptable under *Islamic jurisprudence.* It does not matter what the Russians did, or will do, or how dirty they fight or how dishonest and cruel they are. As Muslims we are under obligation to ALWAYS take the moral and ethical high ground. This is the normative tradition – to follow the Noble Qur’an and Sunnah Or, in another light, ask yourself what our Prophet (Peace And Blessing Be Upon Him) would have done in the same situation. Think about that. “Allah Knows Best.

    16. DCSeeker December 13th, 2009 at 1:47 pm

      لسلام عليكم
      I think Beslan was so beyond just being a “Oops” moment. Necessity has nothing to do with it. It does not matter if taking over a school made tactical sense, or made sense from a “revenge” standpoint or even if it would have hypothetically led to the cessation of Russian operations in Chechnya. The question is, is what Basayev and the mujaheddin did is permissible under Islamic law? The chorus of Islamic scholars condemning the siege was so overwhelming you couldn’t even point to a few and say “Oh, they are corrupt, or influenced by the West.” If the atheists and Zionists and Western imperialist entities kill and maim and torture it does not mean that it becomes a “necessity” for Muslim to do the same. The rules governing conduct in jihad are very, very clear. Basayev, in my opinion, acted far outside of the framework of what is permissible in our religion. History has actually been the most accurate judge of Beslan – you’ll find almost no scholars, anywhere, even within jihadi movements that speak of the event in positive terms (in most cases no one wants to even bring it up because it stains Muslim resistance movements).

    17. al-suyuufi December 13th, 2009 at 4:40 pm

      Since Beslan, and especially since Sadulayev’s prohibiting hostage-takings, how many more do you know of? People can change.

    18. Atif C. December 14th, 2009 at 2:35 am

      Perhaps al-suyuufi, but mere “change of hearts” and new prohibitions on such evil acts does not make up for the acts themselves, nor does it forgive its perpetrators. “Whoops we messed up we’re sorry” does not cut it. Basayev has met his fate, now any and all other surviving individuals responsible for perpetrating this or any other deliberate massacre (no matter what his or her rank or past services to the Chechen cause) of civilians must face justice (preferably by the Chechens themselves). It is the only way to cleanse the putrid stain which has so blemished the Chechen cause and guide it back in the right direction.

    19. al-suyuufi December 14th, 2009 at 12:48 pm

      Do you know if they repented or not? Have they continued those operations after the end of Sadulayev’s presidency (since he forbade them)? On one hand you’re asking for their guidance to the right direction, but when they take steps towards that you say thanks but no thanks?

    20. Atif C. December 14th, 2009 at 6:08 pm

      First of all, I see some discussion regarding who is “really” to blame for the huge number of civilian casualties during various hostage situations…well the answer is that it doesn’t matter whether the victims of those terrorist attacks (especially the parents of all of those children in Beslan) were killed by Russian bombs and bullets or Chechen ones. Yes the Russians employed some incredibly brutal (and outright stupid) tactics, but the fact of the matter is it was these terrorists who created that reprehensible situation in the first place through their cowardly tactics of targeting innocent civilians. The stupidity and apathy for the innocent of the Russians does not make up for the murderous actions and intentions of the perpetrators.

      Furthermore brother al-suyuufi, I don’t know if they repented, but I sincerely hope so for their own soul’s sake…but personal salvation is NOT a substitute for earthly justice. Islam itself recognizes this reality through its system of justice and punishments; yes the guilty always have the opportunity to repent to God for their crimes until the last minute and their victims may even choose to forgive them, but the victims must be allowed to HAVE that option.

      Justice MUST be carried out, and it should be done not by Russian or collaborationist hands but by those Chechen mujahideen who are still true to the cause and haven’t succumbed to blind hatred and violence. The noble Chechen cause has no place for these murderers, and the only path to is to cleanse the otherwise selfless and brave mujahideen of its evil-doers. If there is no justice for these victims, then what kind of government in exile do the Chechens have? One with no legitimacy or respect, even from brothers and sisters who are deeply sympathetic to and identify with the Chechen cause.

    21. DCSeeker December 14th, 2009 at 8:09 pm

      As-Salāmu `Alaykum السلام عليكم
      I think one of the issues that has always bothered Chechen’s (and Muslims in general) is the pervasive, repugnant double-standard that exists when it comes to how the West defines and presents “terrorism.” Russia exploited the West’s paranoia to great effect during the 2nd Chechen war – knowing that if they tossed around the word “terrorist” Europe and the United States would look the other way (which they did). During both the Chechen wars (and now, through their proxy Ramzan Kadryov) the Russians butchered and slaughtered thousands upon thousands of Chechen men, women and children. You don’t even have to take the word of a Muslim; you can simply look at the reports published by the United Nations, Amnesty International, Doctors Without Borders, etc. A good documentary even exists on youtube concerning the post-traumatic stress-disorder that many kaffir Russian soldiers suffered after tours in Chechnya. They talk openly of executing civilians, shooting at children, indiscriminate bombing etc.
      The irony of course in all of this is that the Russian brutality provided the impetus to change what was initially a nationalistic resistance into a full blow jihadi movement with volunteers pouring in from all over the globe. Insha’Allah إن شاء الله the mujaheddin will always be guided down the straight path.
      To tie this back into the original discussion, the question initially asked was, “is Ramzan Kadryov an apostate?” and then whether of not the actions of Basayev and the mujaheddin in Beslan conformed to Islamic law? Kadryov augments Sharia law with mandates handed to him by his Russian masters; he publicly advocates the folk-witchcraft-Sufism religion in place of Islam. He has been photographed with kaffir prostitutes drinking alcohol. He murders Muslims and suppresses Sunni beliefs but publicly declares his allegiance to Islamic values (Kufrul-Nifaaq).This is important because if a consensus of scholars deem him an apostate it validates the jihad in Chechnya. Of course we know that that prevailing opinion from the ulama seems to be “no comment” while a few brave scholars have declared him an apostate and issued fatwas. Regarding Basayev, there is no “necessity,” there is only Islam. Basayev, in my opinion, was not fit to represent Islamic resistance in Chechnya after the Beslan debacle. One could logically ask, after that incident, if Basayev was a sociopath. Insha’Allah إن شاء الله he and the other mujaheddin involved in that operation sought forgiveness.

    22. al-suyuufi December 14th, 2009 at 8:25 pm

      Basayev stated himself that he would be willing to answer in a Chechen court

      “Mr Basayev states that he is “ready to answer before a court for my actions, for my every step, because everyone should be equal before justice regardless of the authority they hold, and of their position”.

      He describes a meeting with his commander-in-chief and formal leader of the Chechen resistance, Aslan Maskhadov, who apparently accused his most effective lieutenant of going too far in Beslan.

      Mr Basayev says he told Mr Maskhadov that he is “ready to stand before a sharia court, and answer to it in all its severity if it judges I should be punished”. He says that such a trial is not possible until the Chechen war ends. He is willing to call a ceasefire and open negotiations with the Russians, but only after the complete withdrawal of Russian forces from Chechnya. “

    23. Atif C. December 14th, 2009 at 9:57 pm

      Walaikum as salaam…wow great response DC…really appreciate the insight and agree with 100% of it…except the “folk-witchcraft-Sufism religion” part.

      I know that self-declared followers of Sufism often perform some very questionable practices as articles of faith (such as dancing for prayer, worshiping graves, etc.), but I think they are largely a misrepresentation of what this particular aspect of our faith was originally supposed to be about. In Islam’s early history, there were always men who choose to live a strictly monastic life as devoid of earthly pleasures as possible in order to become closer to Allah (SWT) and please him. They weren’t considered a separate “sect” then by the muslimeen, and neither did they consider themselves as separate from the ummah. It was only later that they began to be distinguished as “Sufis” by those who could not completely comprehend their ways.

      Thus Sufism remains very much a misunderstood topic both within and outside of the Muslim community and the actions of many of its self-described subscribers certainly doesn’t help. While I don’t consider myself to be a Sufi, I am familiar with several highly respectable and prominent scholars who do (such as Hamzah Yusuf).

      Therefore I can’t help but feel that it’s best to just suspend any and all judgments about orthodoxy and simply embrace all those who consider themselves to be our brothers and sisters in faith. We don’t have to adopt their practices in order to respect, accept, support, and love them as our brothers and sisters. Let’s leave judging of all matters to Allah (SWT).

    24. Atif C. December 14th, 2009 at 9:59 pm

      haha sorry to lead the discussion off-topic again (though it’s somewhat relevant given that most Chechens and many other Muslims in the Caucasus consider themselves to be “Sufis”).

    25. DCSeeker December 15th, 2009 at 1:52 pm

      As-Salāmu `Alaykum السلام عليكم
      Atif I would agree that it is best to not judge other brands of Islam. Hamza Yusuf (who I personally respect) has even stated that if the earlier generations couldn’t solve the differences between Sunni-Shi-Sufi; chances are that we are not going to either. That being said, I think the Sufi “variable” in Chechnya is important. In normative interpretations of Islam Ramzan Kadryov would be recognized as an apostate more readily and probably more openly by the Muslim population in Chechnya.

      This is an awkward example, but we can look back at the KKK’s racist interpretation of Christianity in the South up until to the 1960’s in America. The majority of Americans were repulsed by the mixture of religion and race and when major Christian scholars (bishops, priests the Pope) made public declarations against such interpretations it essentially spelled doom for the KKK as an ideological force.
      Or, from another historical perspective we can look at the embryonic beginnings of Christianity. Why did it bother the Romans so much? They found it intensely troubling (especially as it spread) because it was essentially a doctrinal treatise against slavery and authority. The Roman’s quickly sensed this and attempted numerous times to crush Christian movements and then later augmented and bastardized the entire religion to fit into the Roman hierarchal system of authority and the Roman worldview – which is how we ultimately ended up with Catholicism.

      My point is that a basic, normative interpretation of Islam would likely cause average Muslims in Chechnya to start asking basic questions about the legitimacy of their government, about Kadryov’s butchery and his interpretation of Islam. I think Kadryov uses the Sufism as a blanket to cover himself. Sufism has a specific cultural manifestation in Chechnya and Kadryov figures if he dances in some prayer circles and wears his kufi, he’ll appear to be a “good Muslim.” The Noble Qur’an (as well as the Sunnah) has so many specific, direct things to say about what is kaffir, what is haram, what designates an apostate – no dictator in their right mind would want the religious infrastructure to start asking questions.

      Insha’Allah إن شاء الله the Chechen’s will begin to question their Russian-led government. The consequences if they don’t, I fear, are dire. Allah Knows Best.

      Regarding Basayev: I didn’t know that he was condemned within the Chechen resistance for Beslan and it is interesting to note that he would have been willing to stand before a Sharia court. My guess (I am not a scholar) is that under basic Sharia law his actions would have been deemed unlawful on a number of levels. We will probably never know the real truth about what happened in Beslan because the Russians lie about everything (historically they botch “special” operations) but Basayev would have a hard time convincing anyone, of any faith, that his actions were righteous, and that they were within the bounds of Islamic jurisprudence and jihad.

      What Basayev said post-Beslan about the necessity of the operation, or the desperation of the Chechen people means nothing. I challenge anyone to ask themselves how our Prophet (Peace and Blessings Be Upon Him) would conduct himself if he was surrounded by children tied to explosive wire, covered in their own urine and vomit? It sickens me to even imagine our beloved Prophet (Peace and Blessings Be Upon Him) in such a vile environment.

      Insha’Allah إن شاء الله the mujahidin will never go down this path again. Allah Knows Best.

    26. al-suyuufi December 15th, 2009 at 3:09 pm

      See, this happened when Basayev was leading his own little sabotage group (Riyadh us salikhin it’s called), so even though he was an influential figure you can’t tie Beslan to the entire Chechen movement, even the non-nationalist ones. And I wouldn’t say that his necessity is taking away from his regret of the outcome since he was willing to face the Islamic punishments for it, and later on he did take positions in Chechen government under the strict condition that Beslan-style ops wouldn’t reoccur.

    27. DCSeeker December 15th, 2009 at 5:34 pm

      As-Salāmu `Alaykum السلام عليكم

      I would never say that Basayev was representative of the whole Chechen resistance movement, but Beslan certainly did not do much for what little global support Chechnya had for its independence. The Beslan story is tragic on many levels but probably foremost because women and children ended up being killed. Basayev, who had proven himself to be a global figurehead for Chechen resistance and an excellent soldier ended up only making things worse for Muslims (in my opinion). The Russian war against Chechnya post-Beslan took a gloomy turn. Without the moral high ground or even the tacit support of ordinary Muslims the Chechen mujaheddin found themselves in an intensifying, escalating war against an opponent who was already operating without any moral or ethical scruples. Human Rights Watch noted that “Black Ops” or Special Forces operations against ordinary Chechens accelerated after Beslan. The “gloves came off” as the Russian FSB increased its activity of kidnapping and expecting. Russia had a fairly vocal anti-war movement before Beslan, but it was drowned out it the aftermath as ordinary Chechens called for blood. The wholesale and complete destruction of Chechen towns and villages ensued as the military became simply decided to destroy “nests” where they believed militant activity was based (eerily similar to the American’s Operation Phoenix during the Vietnam War).

      We could argue that because Basayev directed mujaheddin operations completely outside of the mandates of Islam, an entire resistance was effectively crippled, international opinion turned wholly against Chechen resistance and Russia rapidly increased its efforts to obliterate the jihad (killing thousands more Chechen civilians in the process). You may notice that even the Taliban tolerates some humanitarian groups, Muslims and non Muslim, within Afghanistan – but to date almost every single major charity has pulled out of Chechnya. If we were to think of things in a meta-narrative we could almost say that a direct line leads from Beslan to Kadryov. In Palestine, martyrdom operations and the jihad against the Zionist occupiers enjoys popular support. In fact, the resistance movement in Palestine enjoys support in almost every country where Muslims live. We could argue that is because no one connected with the jihadi movement in Palestine took over a school and videotaped the suffocation and death of women and children. If you want to know Basayev’s lasting contribution to the Chechen cause, walk into any masjid, anywhere in the world and ask a brother or sister what they know about Chechnya and how they feel about the Chechen jihad. Insha’Allah إن شاء الله Basayev and the mujaheddin sought forgiveness from Subhanahu wa-ta’ala سبحانه وتعالى

      Allah Knows Best.

    28. DCSeeker December 15th, 2009 at 5:51 pm

      As-Salāmu `Alaykum السلام عليكم

      As a footnote, my apologies for the sloppy writing. Some things did not translate properly during my post.
      Also, I am not an opponent of the resistance in Chechnya I wholeheartedly believe that Allah Subhanahu wa-ta’ala سبحانه وتعالى decides what is best, and that the acts and behavior of our community has a direct correlation on if and how we earn the favors of our Lord.

      The jihad in Bosnia suffered setback after setback and we might speculate that it was because the deen was weak and the intentions of some of the mujahedeen were not righteous. Videotaping the torture and beheading of captives, laughing while shooting civilians etc. Where is the glorification and advocacy of this behavior in the Noble Qur’an or Sunnah?!

      Insha’Allah إن شاء الله we as a community will always resist when we are oppressed but we cannot become victims of our own self promotion. Just because some Muslim picks up a gun and declares war against the kaffir does not give him license to act in any way he wants, and it does not mean that “true Muslims” have to support him. The Noble Qur’an and the Sunnah are specific about the parameters of jihad. Even the ulama in Afghanistan are complaining about global-oriented jihadists feeling so comfortable about using Afghanistan as the place of “showdown” with the West.

      Allah Knows Best.

    29. Atif C. December 15th, 2009 at 6:39 pm

      wow D.C. you know a lot about the world…you must be an academic or journalist! Masha’Allah bro

    30. DCSeeker December 15th, 2009 at 6:53 pm

      As-Salāmu `Alaykum السلام عليكم

      Atif I am humbled by your words. I am not a scholar just a concerned Muslim. The people that amaze me are the resistance fighters in Chechnya and the Chechen people themselves. Insha’Allah إن شاء الله they will always be on the straight path.

    31. DCSeeker December 15th, 2009 at 6:56 pm

      As-Salāmu `Alaykum السلام عليكم
      Atif I am humbled by your words. I am not a scholar just a concerned Muslim, just like you.

      The people that amaze me are the resistance fighters in Chechnya, the shaheed شُهَداء and the Chechen people themselves. Insha’Allah إن شاء الله they will always be on the straight path.

    32. ASLAN March 4th, 2010 at 7:29 pm

      ALMOST ALL LEAVE COMMENTS DO NOT KNOW causes of war.
      THE WAY YOU VERY surprised if I discovered that CHECHENS THINK ABOUT THE OTHER MUSLIMS. Try to know the TRUTH!
      CAUSES OF WAR :
      1991 Free Chechnya by agreement with Moscow, leaving her to leave the military weapons for the formation of the Chechen army. Dudaev dissolve the police released the prisoners of which forms the National Guard all prishodit rapidly decrees issued immediately allowed to carry weapons to sell looted army depots everywhere to walk the streets at night, armed men in cars come from the villages of people being evicted at gunpoint Russian, Armenian, from apartments wholesale Russian Jews fleeing Armenians on the road posts are prohibited to transfer assets since it was purchased in Chechnya. Dudaev tries to justify himself met with reporters at the Institute of Oil – ask him awkward questions are answered laughingly offers education for girls 2 years for boys, 4 years, laws based on Islam, the expulsion is not the Chechen population, he objected on the same day the hostel rector of the Institute rout killed some teachers disappeared. At home printing set poster (Russian do not go away, we need slaves). Dudaev makes bank fraud with advice received in the Russian banks more than $ 1300000000 in Chechnya has been supplying all (fuel, gas, electricity and pensions), all this disappears in a black hole looted 1,800 rail cars, train drivers refuse to travel on the route to Chechnya, captured Russian apartments, good Chechens helped organize the departure in exchange for an apartment, just kill the bad, the flow of refugees into Russia 200000 people in 2 years there is slavery, kidnapping for ransom were the norm, not working 90% of businesses have left the holdouts, some failed in 1991 po1994 killed in Chechnya on the different data from 25000 to 30000 Russian. Moscow decides to help her dissenting positions are strong among the urban population promises to restore order. In November 1994, dissenting Chechens shoots National Guard. By that time 30% of Chechens have already committed or been complicit in serious crimes. Moscow is afraid of retaliation nationalists in Russia, so the truth is withheld. Formally Chechnya within Russia decided to introduce a voisk all think it will cost a demonstration of force. In Chechnya, under the guise of zhurnamistov passing military positions and fortifications removed interviewed in the population of cities no one wants war in the villages opposite. Dudaev produces agitation in the villages among the youth and finds the men taking foreign mercenary soldiers (avgantsy, Latvians, Ingush, Ukrainians, Arabs) weapons left by the Soviet Union lacks Suomeksi antitank weapons. But Moscow believes in a show of force, we introduce a limited contingent of troops to storm the Groznogo allocated 6500 soldiers being few, a lot of armor, even though all the rules of the attackers was to Fact 4 times more militants. The number of militants in the 12000 Groznom and about 9 thousand on the outskirts of the city. 31/12/1994 voiska part of the city with 4-way town seems empty but 40% of civilians did not leave the city. Troops nothing prevents passing half of the route begins the battle with militants so much that they fired rocket-propelled grenades, not only in armored vehicles but also in individual soldiers. Everyone understands war. On the streets there are people trying to hide from a fight, most fighters dressed in civilian. moves together with groups of civilians, shooting at the soldiers are from homes where there are civilians. In a damaged armored vehicles exploding ammunition, the gunmen to intimidate the troops mutilated the corpses of soldiers is indicative of the wounded. No assistance is all thrown into the battle not only consolidates in one direction. Journalists are in the Presidential Palace and the TV station to cover the warrior position militants but the picture in the frame inexorably suggests otherwise. European journalists could not ignore the constant firing artillery at Chechen area for the presidential palace, and fighters dressed in civilian clothes, and mutilated the corpses of Russian soldiers. The culprit just called Russia no one remembered that preceded the war. It is then the world would know the truth about the militants and horrified, but now those who defended the militants trying to preserve the reputation and find their justification.

    33. DCSeeker March 4th, 2010 at 9:09 pm

      The Chechen wars and the jihad have been marred by atrocities – no one would debate that. The point however, is that Chechnya is a Muslim country and a despot (Kadryov) has taken power with the help of the Russians (who seem to predictably start wars with people in Caucasus region 2-3 times every century). Kadryov works with كافر kāfir forces from Russia to murder Chechen Muslims. Kadryov’s private actions contradict his “public” beliefs (Kufrul-Nifaaq) and he attempts to contort Sharia law so that it meets the needs of his regime and his kāfir masters (Kufrul-Istibdaal).

      Insha’Allah إن شاء الله the mujahidin in Chechnya will stay on the straight path.

      Insha’Allah إن شاء الله Chechnya will one day be free from tyranny and the rule of an apostate.

      “Allah Knows Best”

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